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Ada Distilled

Title
Ada Distilled
Subtitle
An Introduction to Ada Programming for Experienced Computer Programmers
Author
Pubdate
Pages
113
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PDF
http://www.adapower.com/pdfs/AdaDistilled07-27-2003.pdf

Preface/Excerpt:

This book is aimed at experienced programmers who want to learn Ada at the programming level. It is not a "...for dummies" book, nor is it intended as a program design book. Instead, we highlight some key features of the Ada language, with coded examples, that are essential for getting started as an Ada programmer.

Ada is a rich and flexibile language used for designing large-scale software systems. This book emphasizes syntax, control structures, subprogram rules, and how-to coding issues rather than design issues. There are other really fine books available that deal with design. Also, this is not a comprehensive treatment of the Ada language. The bibliography lists some books that can help you once you have finished the material in this book.

Think of this a quick-start book, one that enables you, the experienced programmer, to get into the Ada language quickly and easily. The examples use text-oriented programs for simplicity of learning. If you prefer to do the exercises for a GUI environment, check out the sites listed for compilers and tools so you can download bindings for programming in a variety of windowing environments, including Wintel, Linux, and Unix. Of particular interest to those wanting to explore Window style programming are GtkAda, CLAW, GWindows, and JEWL. The last of these, JEWL, is especially useful if you have no prior experience writing Windows programs.

Table of Contents:
1. WHAT IS ADA DISTILLED? ................................................................................................................ 4
2. SUMMARY OF LANGUAGE................................................................................................................ 5
3. TYPES AND THE TYPE MODEL ...................................................................................................... 16
4. CONTROL STRUCTURES FOR ALGORITHMS............................................................................ 26
5. ACCESS TYPES (POINTERS) ............................................................................................................ 33
6. SUBPROGRAMS................................................................................................................................... 40
7. PACKAGE DESIGN.............................................................................................................................. 47
8. CHILD LIBRARY UNITS .................................................................................................................... 52
9. OBJECT-ORIENTED PROGRAMMING WITH PACKAGES....................................................... 57
10. USING STANDARD LIBRARIES AND ANNEXES ....................................................................... 64
11. EXCEPTION MANAGEMENT ........................................................................................................ 71
12. GENERIC COMPONENTS................................................................................................................ 74
13. NEW NAMES FROM OLD ONES .................................................................................................... 82
14. CONCURRENCY WITH TASKING................................................................................................. 87
A. ANNEXES, APPENDICES AND STANDARD LIBRARIES.......................................................... 92
ANNEX L PRAGMAS - LANGUAGE-DEFINED COMPILER DIRECTIVES............................... 104
WINDOWS 95/98/NT/XP/ME/2000 PROGRAMMING ...................................................................... 105
C. BIBLIOGRAPHY............................................................................................................................... 107